optimysticals:

partysoft:

usagov:

Image description: On Saturday, the Navy christened a new research ship the “Sally Ride” after the first U.S. woman and youngest person in space. It is the fifth current ship named for an astronaut. 
Photo from the U.S. Navy

the person doing the christening is dr. tam o’shaughnessy, ride’s partner of 27 yrs. sally ride was not just the first woman and youngest person in space: she was also the first lesbian in space - likely, the first lgbtq person in space.

I know we shared this before but finding out that this ship was christened by Dr. Tam O’Shaughnessy was something that required re-sharing.

optimysticals:

partysoft:

usagov:

Image description: On Saturday, the Navy christened a new research ship the “Sally Ride” after the first U.S. woman and youngest person in space. It is the fifth current ship named for an astronaut. 


Photo from the U.S. Navy

the person doing the christening is dr. tam o’shaughnessy, ride’s partner of 27 yrs. sally ride was not just the first woman and youngest person in space: she was also the first lesbian in space - likely, the first lgbtq person in space.

I know we shared this before but finding out that this ship was christened by Dr. Tam O’Shaughnessy was something that required re-sharing.

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Reblogged from NPR Fresh Air
twerkingderp:

thebisexualfeminist:

This is so important I can’t even put it into words. 
Not all Christians are closed minded assholes.
Not all Muslims are terrorists.
Not all atheists are anti-religion jerks.

THIS

twerkingderp:

thebisexualfeminist:

This is so important I can’t even put it into words. 

Not all Christians are closed minded assholes.

Not all Muslims are terrorists.

Not all atheists are anti-religion jerks.

THIS

Reblogged from Obsession Station

jtotheizzoe:

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The mystery of the roaming rocks of Death Valley’s Racetrack Playa may be at an end. Since their discovery in the 1940s, researchers have speculated about what conditions on the playa could cause 15+ kg rocks to slide tens or hundreds of meters across the dry lakebed. But the rare nature of the movement and the remoteness of the location had prevented direct observation of the phenomenon until last December when a research team caught the rocks in motion (see the timelapse animation above or the source video). Winter rain and snow had created a shallow ice-encrusted pond across the playa by the time the researchers arrived to check their previously installed equipment. Late one sunny morning, the melting ice, only millimeters thick, cracked into plates tens of meters wide and began to move under the light breeze (~4-5 m/s). Despite its windowpane-like thickness, the ice pushed GPS-instrumented rocks up to hundreds of meters at speeds of 2-5 m/min. It took just the right mix of conditions—sun, wind, snow, and water—but the two ice-shoving instances the team observed go a long way toward explaining the sailing rocks. (Image credits: R. Norris et al.; J. Norris, source video; NASA Goddard; via Discover and SciAm)

I always thought of these rocks as Earth’s real-life version of Doctor Who's Weeping Angels. We knew they moved, it just never happened while we were looking (although the rocks of Racetrack Playa, to the best of my knowledge, are not and were never trying to kill us). 

Mystery solved! 

Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart

asylum-art:

Animated Streetart GIFs by A. L. Crego

Artist tumblr | Facebook | on Giphy

Fantastic project by the Spanish photographer and motion designer AL Crego , the variety Street artwork and murals, which run everywhere so his path, photographed and later created from animated GIFs. On his tumblr blog there is also another, very interesting things to discover, I’ve subscribed to the just. The best GIFs we have down here for you:

“An ongoing project for Spanish photographer and motion designer, AL Crego is taking various works of street art to animating them into some great GIFs.”

Reblogged from Hank's Tumblr
womeninspace:

Dava Newman nominated for NASA Deputy Administrator
According to SpaceNews, Obama nominated Dava Newman for the position of Deputy Administrator at NASA. The position was held by Lori Garver from 2009 to 2013 and has since been vacant.
Dava Newman is a professor at MIT and director of the MIT Portugal Program. She is most well known for her work on a formfitting spacesuit, pictured above.
Read Dava Newman’s MIT bio here
[Image: Dava Newman in the form fitting Biosuit.]

womeninspace:

Dava Newman nominated for NASA Deputy Administrator

According to SpaceNews, Obama nominated Dava Newman for the position of Deputy Administrator at NASA. The position was held by Lori Garver from 2009 to 2013 and has since been vacant.

Dava Newman is a professor at MIT and director of the MIT Portugal Program. She is most well known for her work on a formfitting spacesuit, pictured above.

Read Dava Newman’s MIT bio here

[Image: Dava Newman in the form fitting Biosuit.]

Reblogged from THE UNIVERSE
moma:

Futurist Umberto Boccioni, who sought to infuse art with dynamism and energy, was born today in 1882.

[Umberto Boccioni. Unique Forms of Continuity in Space. 1913 (cast 1931)]

moma:

Futurist Umberto Boccioni, who sought to infuse art with dynamism and energy, was born today in 1882.

[Umberto Boccioni. Unique Forms of Continuity in Space. 1913 (cast 1931)]

drakeshairline:

tequilaandtiramisu:

A moment of silent for all those in retail this holiday season.

this cartoon works at target clearly

Reblogged from OctopusMonkey

tiffanylofton:

Tabulaa - Bucket List - The Bean, Chicago

https://tabulaa.com/vitae/see_the_bean

Cloud Gate, referred to by locals as “The Bean”, for obvious reasons,is a public sculpture by talented British artist Anish Kapoor in Chicago, Illinois.

Cloud Gate, a public sculpture by Indian-born British artist Anish Kapoor, is the centerpiece of the AT&T Plaza in Millennium Park within the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois, United States. The sculpture and AT&T Plaza are located on top of Park Grill, between the Chase Promenade and McCormick Tribune Plaza & Ice Rink. 

Constructed between 2004 and 2006, the sculpture is nicknamed “The Bean” because of its bean-like shape. Made up of 168 stainless steel plates welded together, its highly polished exterior has no visible seams. It is 33 by 66 by 42 feet, and weighs 110 short tons. 

Said to have been inspired by liquid mercury,the sculpture’s surface reflects and distorts the city’s skyline. Visitors are able to walk around and under Cloud Gate’s 12-foot high arch. On the underside is the “omphalos” (Greek for “navel”), a concave chamber that warps and multiplies reflections. The sculpture builds upon many of Kapoor’s artistic themes, and is popular with tourists as a photo-taking opportunity for its unique reflective properties.

nubbsgalore:

photos from dubai’s 828 meter tall burj khalifa (save the first and last photos, which show the building) by (click pic) daniel cheongkarim nafatnibjoern lauen and dave alexander. duabai only experiences this in september and march, when seasonal changes in temperature creates an abundance of early morning fog. (see also: fog over new york, london and chicago)